(Source: just-un-ti-tled, via herekitty)

(Source: a-f-t-e-r-n-i-g-h-t, via a-nja)

georgetakei:

Don’t poo poo this joke. 
"Holder memorably referred to the U.S. as a ‘nation of cowards’ when it comes to race, but that could be a better state of affairs than the one we now have. It’s far more damning that this is a nation of self-declared racial innocents, blithely detached from its past and their prejudices."

Jelani Cobb on talking openly about Obama and race: http://nyr.kr/1l3ChHc (via newyorker)

This article is so on point.

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

Tags: race racism obama

"'Just because I got an Emmy nomination doesn't mean the lives of trans people aren't in peril every day.'"

— Laverne Cox (via angerisbeautiful-79)

(via feminspire)

nevver:

But to be young was very heaven, Katrin Korfmann

nevver:

But to be young was very heaven, Katrin Korfmann

smilebooth:

Prabhjot Gill

smilebooth:

Prabhjot Gill

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."

— Dave Barry  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: , via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: memorysong, via herekitty)

(via herekitty)

"When I was the editor of my college newspaper, a woman wrote an op-ed piece in response to a banner on the entryway of the student union that read: “1 in 5 women in college have been raped.” As a survivor of a recent rape, the writer’s PTSD was triggered and she didn’t feel safe on campus. My own history with PTSD at the time was limited. I was sexually assaulted in a college dorm room, which was traumatic, but luckily didn’t prevent me from enjoying the rest of my college experience. A few years later, I was diagnosed with PTSD not because of relationship violence, but because of a terrible breakup that raised latent trust and abandonment issues. When my therapist diagnosed me, I laughed and called the diagnosis “pathetic,” even though the triggers (e.g. smelling my old perfume, opening benign emails from friends) felt very real to me, and my reactions to the triggers were nothing short of panic attacks. I learned, however, that the best remedy to these post-traumatic reactions was to be gentle with myself and recognize my limits, no matter how silly they seemed. I exposed myself to my triggers on my own time and strategized coping mechanisms for unpredictable affronts: for instance, I chose not to watch romantic comedies, but I couldn’t have predicted that a Google Chrome ad would make me hyperventilate. Triggers are as unavoidable as they are idiosyncratic. I have my own coping strategies for my own experience, but it would be horrendously presumptuous to tell a rape survivor or a POW how they should manage their own triggers."

Are All Trigger Warnings Created Equal? (via feminspire)

Yes, folks, I’ve been requoted.

"You won’t allow me to go to school.
I won’t become a doctor.
Remember this:
One day you will be sick."

Poem written by an 11 year old Afghan girl 

This poem was recorded in a NYT magazine article about female underground poetry groups in Afghanistan. An amazing article about the ways in which women are using a traditional two line poetry form to express their resistance to male oppression, their feelings about love (considered blasphemous).

Here’s the link

(via conansdoyles)

(Source: katyuno, via livmylife)

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

(via heavenrants)